Book Reviews

Review of Keeper of the Lost Cities 8.5: Unlocked

There is sooooo much to say about this book! There’s a bunch of things I loved about it, a few things – not so much. So, here it goes.

Series Guide

I loved the idea of a series guide. There is so much to keep track of in the Keeper series, and as an avid fan, I loved reminiscing with the characters and reading about additional tidbits. The series guide made up about 2/3 – maybe more of the 747- page book. So the first thing I want to point out is that this does include a novella which is abut 235 pages long. For many middle grade books, that would even be considered a full book. However, if you’re used to the size of the Keeper books, calling this a novella makes perfect sense. We’ll talk more about the novella later.

The guide consists of several sections: The Registry, The World of the Lost Cities, Portraits, Life in the Lost Cities, Rebel Groups, Intelligent Species, Activities, and special Keefe memories.

My favorite parts were the portraits and Keefe memories. I’ve always been a fan of Keeper Art by Laura Hollingsworth, and her art was just as spectacular as ever. Even if you skip over the other parts – make sure you take a peek. These are breathtaking.

I liked the Registry section. It was fun getting more details on some of the characters. And, as usual, Keefe’s did not disappoint. Some of them were a little long. I couldn’t tell if it was just my anticipation of getting to the novella part or if some parts were just long. Either way, I still enjoyed it.

Life in the Lost Cities section was interesting for me as a writer (always learning from the greats), but I feel it could have been a little shorter for kids who just want to “get to the good stuff”.

Another favorite section of mine was the Activities section. There are fun quizzes, a coloring page, and recipes that look so fun to try. My daughters went shopping recently and are planning to try the Lushberry Juice.

The Novella

THIS is what I was dying to get to. If you’ve read Book 8, then you know why. I had to find out what happened. Yes, the Keeper books can have killer cliff hangers. I usually do not like cliff hangers. I like to have some closure – but as a writer I completely get why they are important. Too much closure can deflate interest.

The novella was different from the other books in that each chapter switched between Sophie and Keefe’s point of view. I really liked that. It was cool to get inside Keefe’s head – though definitely not less frustrating *looking at YOU Keefe*

Over all I found the novella to be informative, curious, relieving, hopeful, and also quite sad. I’m not going to elaborate on that. You’ll have to read it to find out why. Of course the biggest feeling the book left me with was anticipation. I just have to know what’s going to happen next.

From a Writer’s Perspective

I love writing, world creating, and learning. So part of me wanted this book to learn about how much detail goes into world creating – and boy is it a lot! While reading it with a writer’s eye, I found it so interesting to see the development of the characters, the world building, and just how much fun a writer can have with their creation. There is a beautiful map ( illustrated by Francesca Baerald ) of the Lost Cities attached to the inside cover of the book. Absolute Perfection!

Shannon Messenger worked hard on this series and her world building and it shows. Somewhere I read a quote from her that it took a year for her to create this world. I believe it. There is not one detail she hadn’t thought of. She is definitely someone to learn from.

If you are on the fence about getting the book – I say go for it. There’s so much to it that I really feel a Keeper fan will enjoy some – if not -all of it. I wish it didn’t end the way it did, but again, as a writer I totally get why.

While I noticed the hardback wasn’t available anymore as of today’s date, you can still find a paperback or E-book here:

Overall rating: 📚📚📚📚📚

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